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Image of empty art gallery
Art, Books & art, Curiosities, Paintings

A postscript to “Selling public art” – another sell-off

This is a short postscript to the last post, it's not going to be a regular theme. I prefer to focus on the positive, if possible. Another public museum is selling off art to pay the bills. Berkshire Museum in Massachusetts (USA) is selling off 40 of it's most notable paintings, sculptures and drawings -… Continue reading A postscript to “Selling public art” – another sell-off

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Image of an empty art gallery
Art, Curiosities

Going, going … GONE! When is it acceptable to sell public art?

Going, going ... GONE! When is it acceptable to sell public art? It's happening more frequently than you might think. There was a time when I had assumed that once a work of art had been gifted or bought by a public art gallery, there it would stay (apart from loans and special exhibitions). Later… Continue reading Going, going … GONE! When is it acceptable to sell public art?

Thoreau, Henry David, Writers

Happy birthday, Henry David Thoreau. 200 years old today (1817-1862). Quotes & thoughts

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Henry Thoreau was many things: an essayist, poet, practical philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor and historian. Those were days when there was still room to do many different things, rather than the intense specialism that is common today. But perhaps most famously, he was author of the book… Continue reading Happy birthday, Henry David Thoreau. 200 years old today (1817-1862). Quotes & thoughts

Artist David_Wilkie Painting The_Letter_of_Introduction
Art, Books & art, Life in the Long 19th Century, Paintings, Readers reading

Painting: The Letter of Introduction (1813) by David Wilkie (we’ve all been in this room)

Today is the anniversary of the death of Sir David Wilkie (18 November 1785 – 1 June 1841). A Scottish painter. When I think of Wilkie, I immediately think of the The Letter of Introduction. The Letter of Introduction (1813) Readers reading series #11 The painting was completed in the same year that Jane Austen's… Continue reading Painting: The Letter of Introduction (1813) by David Wilkie (we’ve all been in this room)

Featured image for a blog post on the English writer, Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1803-1873)
Bulwer-Lytton, Edward

OTD b. Edward Bulwer-Lytton. More to him than one famously bad opening line

I enjoy blogging, but wish I did it more frequently. Usually my thoughts don't get further than the garden, some end up as tweets. So here is a compromise solution, a half tweet/half blog post, though by the time you read this it may have grown. There is a book quiz at the end. Today… Continue reading OTD b. Edward Bulwer-Lytton. More to him than one famously bad opening line

Mary Had a Little Lamb music sheet
Audio, Curiosities, History, Multimedia, Music, Science & technology, Writers

OTD in 1830 a poem was published, supposedly the first words ever recorded (1878)

On this day in 1830, a poem (later a nursery rhyme) Mary Had a Little Lamb, by Sarah Hale was published. Later in the decade Lowell Mason set the poem to a melody adding repetition in the verses. The poem was the first thing recorded by Thomas Edison on his newly invented phonograph in 1878… Continue reading OTD in 1830 a poem was published, supposedly the first words ever recorded (1878)

Art, Brontë, Charlotte, Brontë, Emily, Collins, Wilkie, Dickinson, Emily, Famous and appreciated … too late, Graphic art, Orwell, George, Pre-Raphaelites, The Woman in White

OTD d. Emily Dickinson – and the benefits of obscurity to a writer

Emily Dickinson - and the benefits of obscurity to a writer Today is the anniversary of the death of the great American poet, Emily Dickinson (10 Dec 1830 – 15 May 1886). Another author from my 'famous and appreciated … too late' series. All quotes in this post are from Emily's writing, unless mentioned otherwise.… Continue reading OTD d. Emily Dickinson – and the benefits of obscurity to a writer