More literary heroines (collective noun?)

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Following on from a previous post The UK’s favourite 15 literary heroines, here are some other heroines that might have made it, but didn’t. I leave you to identify the books they came from! By the way, what is the collective noun for literary heroines? A quill? A scribble? A canon? Thank you, Bill, for your suggestions of more names (via Facebook) – now added. Any others missing? Whether obvious, interesting or silly?

  • Alice in Wonderland
  • Angelina Johnson
  • Anne Elliot
  • Beatrice
  • Belle de Jour
  • Bridget Jones
  • Celie
  • Cordelia
  • Daenerys Targaryen
  • Dorothea Brooke
  • Elinor / Marianne Dashwood
  • Eliza Doolittle
  • Emma Bovary
  • Francesca da Rimini
  • Guinevere
  • Gwendolen Harleth
  • Helen of Troy
  • Hermione Grainger
  • Holly Golightly
  • Isabel Archer
  • Juliet
  • Kate Croy
  • Lady Chatterley
  • Lady Macbeth
  • Lady of Shalott
  • Lucy Pevensie
  • Lucy Snowe
  • Marian Halcombe
  • Mary Barton
  • Mary Garth
  • Mary Poppins
  • Matilda Wormwood
  • Miss Havisham
  • Moll Flanders
  • Mrs Danvers
  • Pippi Longstocking
  • Pollyanna
  • Rachel Verinder
  • Tinkerbell

The original list:

  1. Elizabeth Bennet – Pride & Prejudice (1813) Jane Austen
  2. Miss Marple – Miss Marple – (1927) Agatha Christie
  3. Jane Eyre – Jane Eyre – (1847) Charlotte Bronte
  4. Scarlett O’Hara – Gone With the Wins (1936) Margaret Mitchell
  5. Jo March – Little Women (1880) Louisa May Alcott
  6. Eponine – Les Miserables (1862) – Victor Hugo
  7. Arwyn – The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (first published 1954) J. R. R Tolkien
  8. Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Tess of the d’Urbervilles (1891) Thomas Hardy
  9. Catherine Earnshaw – Wuthering Heights (1847) Emily Bronte
  10. Galadriel – The Hobbit / The Lord of the Rings (1937) J. R. R. Tolkien
  11. Anna Karenina – Anna Karenina (1877) Leo Tolstoy
  12. Daisy Buchanan – The Great Gatsby (1925) F. Scott Fitzgerald
  13. Bathsheba Everdene – Far From the Madding Crowd (1874) Thomas Hardy
  14. Becky Sharp – Vanity Fair (1848) William Makepeace Thackeray
  15. Emma – Emma (1815) Jane Austen
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2 thoughts on “More literary heroines (collective noun?)

  1. I love this post, and I love your blog. I saw you spruiking it on 101 Books. I don’t think this is too niche at all – I think its great. You have a new follower!

    Like

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